Comparison of the SIMARD MD to Clinical Impression in Assessing Fitness to Drive in Patients with Cognitive Impairment

  • Madelaine L. Wernham Dalhousie University
  • Pamela G. Jarrett Horizon Health Network
  • Connie Stewart University of New Brunswick
  • Elizabeth MacDonald Horizon Health Network
  • Donna MacNeil Horizon Health Network
  • Cynthia Hobbs Horizon Health Network
Keywords: driving, SIMARD MD, dementia, mild cognitive impairment, clinical decision

Abstract

Background

The assessment of fitness to drive in patients with cognitive impairment is complex. The SIMARD MD was developed to assist with assessing fitness to drive. This study compares the clinical decision made by a geriatrician regarding driving with the SIMARD MD score.

Methods

Patients with a diagnosis of mild dementia or mild cognitive impairment, who had a SIMARD MD test, were included in the sample. A retrospective chart review was completed to gather diagnosis, driving status, and cognitive and functional information.

Results

Sixty-three patients were identified and 57 met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 77.1 years (SD 8.9). The most common diagnosis was Alzheimer’s disease in 22 (38.6%) patients. The mean MMSE score was 24.9 (SD 3.34) and the mean MoCA was 19.9 (SD 3.58). The mean SIMARD MD score was 37.2 (SD 19.54). Twenty-four patients had a SIMARD MD score ≤ 30, twenty-eight between 31–70, and five scored > 70. The SIMARD MD scores did not differ significantly compared to the clinical decision (ANOVA p value = 0.14).

Conclusions

There was no association between the SIMARD MD scores and the geriatricians’ clinical decision regarding fitness to drive in persons with mild dementia or mild cognitive impairment.

Author Biography

Madelaine L. Wernham, Dalhousie University
Medical Student
Published
2014-04-10
How to Cite
Wernham, M. L., Jarrett, P. G., Stewart, C., MacDonald, E., MacNeil, D., & Hobbs, C. (2014). Comparison of the SIMARD MD to Clinical Impression in Assessing Fitness to Drive in Patients with Cognitive Impairment. Canadian Geriatrics Journal, 17(2), 63-69. https://doi.org/10.5770/cgj.17.100
Section
Original Research