Psychotropic Medication Use in Canadian Long-Term Care Patients Referred for Psychogeriatric Consultation

Authors

  • Corinne E. Fischer 1 Mental Health Service, St. Michaels Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2 Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 3 Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Carole Cohen 3 Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada 4 Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Lauren Forrest 3 Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Tom A. Schweizer 2 Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 3 Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada 5 Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Donald Wasylenki 1 Mental Health Service, St. Michaels Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2 Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 3 Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5770/cgj.v14i3.18

Keywords:

antipsychotic agents, behavioral disturbances, aggression, dementia, depression

Abstract

Background and Puspose

Prior studies have shown a high prevalence of psychotropic medication use among patients residing in long-term care homes (LTCHs). The purpose of this study was to examine psychotropic medication use by LTCH patients in a metropolitan Canadian city referred to outreach teams for psychiatric assessment.

Methods

A retrospective review of charts from specialized psychogeriatric outreach teams serving a large metropolitan city in Canada was undertaken. Data from 68 charts were reviewed. Data were analyzed using descriptive and correlational statistics.

Results

Antipsychotic medications were the most frequent drugs prescribed to patients referred for psychogeriatric assessment (55.9%), followed by antidepressants (50.0%), cognitive enhancers (44.1%) and benzodiazepines (29.4%). More than a quarter of patients (26.5%) were on three psychotropic medications. Medications were adjusted in 35.3% of cases mostly resulting in dose increases. Only 5.9% of patients had their medication dose reduced.

Conclusions

This preliminary exploratory study suggests that patients referred to specialized outreach teams may be a difficult-to-treat population. Further studies are required to establish effective prescribing practices and service delivery models.

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Published

2011-09-26

How to Cite

1.
Fischer CE, Cohen C, Forrest L, Schweizer TA, Wasylenki D. Psychotropic Medication Use in Canadian Long-Term Care Patients Referred for Psychogeriatric Consultation. Can Geriatr J [Internet]. 2011 Sep. 26 [cited 2022 Aug. 8];14(3):73-7. Available from: https://cgjonline.ca/index.php/cgj/article/view/18

Issue

Section

Original Research