Avoidable Hospitalizations in Persons with Dementia: a Population-Wide Descriptive Study (2000–2015)

Authors

  • Claire Godard-Sebillotte McGill University
  • Erin Strumpf McGill University
  • Nadia Sourial McGill University
  • Louis Rochette McGill University, Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ)
  • Eric Pelletier McGill University, Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ)
  • Isabelle Vedel McGill University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5770/cgj.24.486

Keywords:

primary care, interdisciplinary primary care teams, dementia, avoidable hospitalization, Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions

Abstract

Background

Whether avoidable hospitalizations in community-dwelling persons with dementia have decreased during primary care reforms is unknown.

Methods

We described the prevalence and trends in avoidable hos­pitalizations in population-based repeated yearly cohorts of 192,144 community-dwelling persons with incident dementia (Quebec, 2000–2015) in the context of a province-wide pri­mary care reform, using the provincial health administrative database.

Results

Trends in both types of Ambulatory Care Sensitive Condition (ACSC) hospitalization (general and older population) and 30-day readmission rates remained constant with average rates per 100 person-years: 20.5 (19.9–21.1), 31.7 (31.0–32.4), 20.6 (20.1–21.2), respectively. Rates of delayed hospital discharge (i.e., alternate level of care (ALC) hospitalizations) decreased from 23.8 (21.1–26.9) to 17.9 (16.1–20.1) (relative change -24.6%).

Conclusions

These figures shed light on the importance of the phenomenon, its lack of improvement for most outcomes over the years, and the need to develop evidence-based policies to prevent avoidable hospitalizations in this vulnerable population.

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Published

2021-09-02

How to Cite

1.
Godard-Sebillotte C, Strumpf E, Sourial N, Rochette L, Pelletier E, Vedel I. Avoidable Hospitalizations in Persons with Dementia: a Population-Wide Descriptive Study (2000–2015). Can Geriatr J [Internet]. 2021 Sep. 2 [cited 2021 Dec. 4];24(3):209-21. Available from: https://cgjonline.ca/index.php/cgj/article/view/486

Issue

Section

Original Research