The Cultural Diversity of Dementia Patients and Caregivers in Primary Care Case Management: a Pilot Mixed Methods Study

Authors

  • Xin Qiang Yang McGill University
  • Isabelle Vedel McGill University
  • Vladimir Khanassov McGill University, Herzl Family Practice Centre, Jewish General Hospital

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5770/cgj.24.490

Keywords:

dementia, culture, ethnicity, mixed methods study

Abstract

Context

The Canadian reality of dementia care may be complicated by the cultural diversity of patients and their informal caregivers.

Objectives

To what extent do needs differ between Canadian- and foreign-born patients and caregivers? What are their experiences with the illness in primary care case management?

Methods

Mixed methods, sequential explanatory design (a cross-sectional study, followed by a qualitative descriptive study), involving 15 pairs of patients and caregivers.

Results

Foreign-born patients had more needs compared to their Canadian-born counterparts. Foreign-born caregivers reported more stress, more problems, and increased need for services. However, the reported experiences of Canadian- vs. foreign-born individuals were similar.

Conclusion

The results remain hypothesis-generating. The present pilot illustrated the suitability of mixed methods to this area of study, which deserves further investigation to better serve all mem­bers of a population already vulnerable by age and disease.

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Published

2021-09-02

How to Cite

1.
Yang XQ, Vedel I, Khanassov V. The Cultural Diversity of Dementia Patients and Caregivers in Primary Care Case Management: a Pilot Mixed Methods Study. Can Geriatr J [Internet]. 2021 Sep. 2 [cited 2021 Dec. 1];24(3):184-9. Available from: https://cgjonline.ca/index.php/cgj/article/view/490

Issue

Section

Original Research