Restraint Practices in Incapable Wandering Patients During COVID-19: Ethics and Best Practice Recommendations

Authors

  • Olivia Geen McMaster University
  • Shannon Gui McMaster University
  • Sandra Andreychuk McMaster University
  • Tony DeBono McMaster University; The Royal Mental Health Centre Ottawa
  • Haroon Yousuf McMaster University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5770/cgj.25.575

Keywords:

COVID-19, Bioethics, Dementia

Abstract

Patients who wander as one of their psychological and behavioural symptoms of dementia are often unable to follow or recall Infection Prevention and Control precautions, putting them at risk of contracting or spreading COVID-19. Physical and chemical restraints have been used to limit the risk of transmission to wandering patients and their care providers, but restraints are not the standard of care for wandering behaviour in non-pandemic scenarios. Although provincial policies on restraint use are available, their guidance may not provide the context-dependent information necessary for individual patient decisions. To address this knowledge gap, we reviewed the medical, ethical, and legal considerations through an interdisciplinary approach including nurses, physicians, ethicists, hospital leadership, risk management, and legal counsel. We present an ethical framework that front-line health-care workers can use to create a balanced patient-centred care plan for incapable wandering patients who are at risk of contracting or spreading COVID-19.

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Published

2022-12-01

How to Cite

1.
Geen O, Gui S, Andreychuk S, DeBono T, Yousuf H. Restraint Practices in Incapable Wandering Patients During COVID-19: Ethics and Best Practice Recommendations. Can Geriatr J [Internet]. 2022 Dec. 1 [cited 2023 Feb. 7];25(4):324-7. Available from: https://cgjonline.ca/index.php/cgj/article/view/575

Issue

Section

Original Research